She's so refined. I think I'll kill myself.

I want to see everything now. And while none of it will be me when it goes in, after a while it'll all gather together inside and it'll be me.
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  • “ If someone were to die at the age of 63 after a lifelong battle with MS or Sickle Cell, we’d all say they were a “fighter” or an “inspiration.” But when someone dies after a lifelong battle with severe mental illness and drug addiction, we say it was a tragedy and tell everyone “don’t be like him, please seek help.” That’s bullshit. Robin Williams sought help his entire life. He saw a psychiatrist. He quit drinking. He went to rehab. He did this for decades. That’s HOW he made it to 63. For some people, 63 is a fucking miracle. I know several people who didn’t make it past 23 and I’d do anything to have 40 more years with them. ”

    —    

    anonymous reader on The Dish

    One of the more helpful and insightful things I’ve seen about depression/suicide in the last couple of days.

    (via mysweetetc)

    I know this is late but I was in the hospital and dealing with my own suicidality when Robin Williams died. One of the hardest things for me to deal with about my chronic mental health issues (besides my symptoms) is that if I finally die because of them, almost nobody will remember me for my fight. No one will remember me for somehow managing to live past 16; 20; 22; 25. Instead I’ll be remembered for failing to live longer than I did. I can’t think of any other chronic high-fatality illness in which people memorialize your death as a failure instead of a life-long struggle.

    (via riotrite)

    (via amshe)

    Teachers are often unaware of the gender distribution of talk in their classrooms. They usually consider that they give equal amounts of attention to girls and boys, and it is only when they make a tape recording that they realize that boys are dominating the interactions. Dale Spender, an Australian feminist who has been a strong advocate of female rights in this area, noted that teachers who tried to restore the balance by deliberately ‘favouring’ the girls were astounded to find that despite their efforts they continued to devote more time to the boys in their classrooms. Another study reported that a male science teacher who managed to create an atmosphere in which girls and boys contributed more equally to discussion felt that he was devoting 90 per cent of his attention to the girls. And so did his male pupils. They complained vociferously that the girls were getting too much talking time.

    In other public contexts, too, such as seminars and debates, when women and men are deliberately given an equal amount of the highly valued talking time, there is often a perception that they are getting more than their fair share. Dale Spender explains this as follows:

    “The talkativeness of women has been gauged in comparison not with men but with silence. Women have not been judged on the grounds of whether they talk more than men, but of whether they talk more than silent women.”

    In other words, if women talk at all, this may be perceived as ‘too much’ by men who expect them to provide a silent, decorative background in many social contexts.

    “ Don’t look for peace. Don’t look for any other state than the one you are in now; otherwise, you will set up inner conflict and unconscious resistance. Forgive yourself for not being at peace. The moment you completely accept your non-peace, your non-peace becomes transmuted into peace. Anything you accept fully will get you there, will take you into peace. This is the miracle of surrender. ”

    —    Eckhart Tolle (via thecalminside)

    (via deadenddreams)

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